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11ig -- Emissions into air by industry, 2008-2019

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Field for searching for a specific value in the list box. This is examples of values you can search for.Fossil carbon dioxide CO2 (t) , Biogenic carbon dioxide CO2-bio (t) , Nitrous oxide N2O (t) ,

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Field for searching for a specific value in the list box. This is examples of values you can search for.2008 , 2009 , 2010 ,

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Field for searching for a specific value in the list box. This is examples of values you can search for.Total , A-X Whole economy (00-99) , Households ,

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Obs:

30.9.2021. Households transport emission have been corrected for year 2008.
Description of statistic
Concepts and definitions

Industries (TOL2008) and households

Industrial classification, 64 classes and households. The industrial classification divides units into industry classes based on their main economic activity. The main economic activity is the one that produces a majority of the unit's value added. The classification used is the Finnish national classification (TOL) derived from the statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE). Classification also includes households.

Information

Fossil carbon dioxide CO2 (t)

Carbon dioxide is a long-lived greenhouse gas. It is naturally present in the atmosphere at certain concentrations. Human activities, which involve combustion of fossil fuels such as conventional heat and power production, release fossil-based carbon dioxide emissions into atmosphere. Emissions into air by industry -statistic considers peat as fossil fuel.

Biogenic carbon dioxide CO2-bio (t)

Biogenic carbon dioxide is defined as carbon dioxide released from direct combustion of biomass or from combustion of bio-based fuel. These include for example wood, sewage sludge, biodegradable waste and biogas. Biogenic carbon dioxide is also defined as greenhouse gas.

Nitrous oxide N2O (t)

Nitrous oxide is a strong greenhouse gas: its impact on global warming is significantly greater than of carbon dioxide per unit of mass. Nitrous oxide is also an ozone-depleting substance.

Methane CH4 (t)

Methane is a gaseous compound of carbon which is naturally present in the atmosphere at small concentrations. Methane is formed in anaerobic decomposition of organic matter. Such processes include digestion of biodegradable waste, manure or sewage sludge. Methane is a short-lived greenhouse gas and stronger than carbon dioxide

Sulphur dioxide SO2 (t)

Sulphur dioxide is a gaseous compound. A majority of sulphur dioxide in the atmosphere originates from human activities. Combustion of fossil fuels which contain sulphur and smelting of sulphur-rich mineral ores release sulphur dioxide emissions into atmosphere. When combined with water, sulphuric acid is formed which results in acid rain.

Nitrogen dioxide NO2 (t)

Nitrogen dioxide is a gaseous compound which acts as a precursor for the formation of tropospheric ozone. Nitrogen dioxide is formed during high-temperature combustion such as in internal combustion engines of vehicles. It is also produced during certail industrial processes.

Carbon monoxide CO (t)

Carbon monoxide is a gaseous compound of carbon that affects the abundance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, where it is naturally present at small concentrations. Carbon monoxide is formed in incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. Chemical industry consumes and also emits carbon monoxide.

Volatile organic compounds NMVOC (t)

NMVOC, non-methane volatile organic compound, is a generic name for compounds of carbon (excluding methane) which evaporate or sublimate easily at room temperature. NMVOC emissions originate mainly from the use of solvents and combustion of carbon-based fuels. NMVOCs react with nitrogen oxides to form tropospheric ozone.

Ammonia NH3 (t)

Ammonia is a gaseous compound of nitrogen and hydrogen. Emissions of ammonia originate mainly from agriculture where ammonia is used as fertilizer. It also evaporates naturally from the breakdown and volatilization of urea. Ammonia contributes to the formation of atmospheric aerosols and of nitrous oxides via increases in nitrification and denitrification, as well as causes eutrophication and acidification.

Hydrofluorocarbon HFC (t)

HFCs, hydrofluorocarbons, are man-made compounds of fluorine, hydrogen and carbon. They are short-lived and strong greenhouse gases having an impact on global warming of hundreds or thousands of times greater than carbon dioxide per unit of mass. HFCs are commonly used in air conditions and as refrigerants.

Perfluorocarbons PFC (t)

PFCs, perfluorocarbons, are man-made compounds of fluorine and carbon. PFCs are extremely long-lived and powerful greenhouse gases. PFC emissions originate from direct use of the substance in electronics industry and refrigeration systems, and are emitted as by-product during aluminum production.

Sulphur hexafluoride SF6 (t)

Sulphur hexafluoride, SF6, is a gaseous compound of sulphur and fluorine. SF6 is an extremely long-lived and the most potent greenhouse gas having an impact on global warming of over 20 000 times greater than carbon dioxide per unit of mass. SF6 is used as an insulator for cooling purposes in power transfer applications.

Particulates PM 2,5 (t)

PM 2.5 refers to particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less. Particulate matter can appear in solid or liquid state and is suspended in the atmosphere. Particulate matter occurs naturally in the atmosphere. Human activities such as combustion of fuels, traffic and industrial processes release particulates into the atmosphere. Particulates have an adverse effect on human health.

Particulates PM 10 (t)

PM 10 refers to particulate matter with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less. Particulate matter can appear in solid or liquid state and is suspended in the atmosphere. Particulate matter occurs naturally in the atmosphere. Human activities such as combustion of fuels, traffic and industrial processes release particulates into the atmosphere. Particulates have an adverse effect on human health.

Greenhouse gases (CO2-fos, CH4, N2O, HFC, PFC, SF6) CO2-eq (t)

Direct greenhouse gases (fossil CO2, CH4, N2O, HFC, PFC, SF6) are those gaseous compounds which are released to atmosphere and have a direct effect on global warming. Direct greenhouse gas emissions are reported as carbon dioxide equivalents to measure their combined global warming potential. Biogenic CO2 is not accounted, since vegetation is assumed to have bound carbon during growth.